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Paul R
Posted: Saturday, July 04, 2020 2:36:21 AM

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Joined: 1/11/2007
Posts: 9,004
Location: Lincolnshire
That’s cool. Didn’t know such a thing existed!

Paul R
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Saturday, July 04, 2020 8:49:27 AM
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hi Paul,

when you think of the old dirt pans drawn by track-type tractors still in use in the UK today, I never understood why there are any scrapedozers in the Kingdom. OK, bowl capacity is smaller. But cycle time is shorter since you don't have to turn around the scrapedozer. You work in shuttle traffic and its operator sits sideways, like in an underground loader.

Cheers,

Max
kcmtoys
Posted: Sunday, July 05, 2020 1:44:06 PM

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Joined: 4/3/2003
Posts: 2,081
Location: Rockford,IL.
Very nice Mr. Scholz, thanks for posting. My understanding of the machine is that it was designed to be used in mountainous terrains where there is no room for turning around, or room to stack material. Here in the US, it would be impracticable to use as most jobs that use scrapers and Cat/Pans,dozers are usually large areas with long runs. The Cat/Pans are used in areas with heavy brown/blue clay, and srapers need a push dozer. There were two versions of the Scrape Dozer. First was a rather simple model, and the second a lot more detailed. I have not seen any for sale in quite a long time. Teeth
kcmtoys
Posted: Sunday, July 05, 2020 2:25:56 PM

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Posts: 2,081
Location: Rockford,IL.
Not trying to hijack your post, here are a couple of pics of the earlier model. d'oh! Ken


Scraer Dozer 3 by Ken Wheeler, on Flickr"/>


Scraer Dozer 2 by Ken Wheeler, on Flickr"/>


Mr. Scholz
Posted: Sunday, July 05, 2020 3:48:27 PM
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hi Ken,

thanks for chiming in! I have the same old NZG SR85, but minus the nice box.

Yes, the story of the scrapedozer being a mountain goat comes around from time to time. And when you see, how well they perform in Japan's mountainous landscape, it's true. Because an empty scrapedozer has a high HP/weight ratio, it usually can outclimb dozers. But actually the concept started as a military earthmover for the Wehrmacht: The idea was a machine that can cope with the soil conditions found in Central Europe under any weather conditions.

Here in Germany, fertile topsoil is protected by law. So when you want to build an industrial park, new roads, a glass house center - you have to strip the top soil and keep it for later reuse. That's a task where scrapedozers really shine and a single machine can outperform a whole team of medium-sized excavator + ADTs hands down. Mining clay also is real scrapedozer territory. The Japanese used it for farm development in the Asian rain forest with success and pioneering roads under such conditions is also something these machines can deliver convincing results.
When you add ripping teeth to the bowl opening, they also can handle soft rock like shale, but they are no tuff rock machines like dozers are. And you need transport distances of 60 - 600 yards, that's perfect.

I'm pretty sure the M9 ACE was inspired by the early scrapedozers, but I'm not 100% sure about that.


Cheers,
Max
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Sunday, July 05, 2020 5:45:40 PM
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Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Ken, both NZG scrapedozers have a fatal flaw (more apparently on the SR2001): There is no connection between the cross tube and the bowl floor. Especially the SR2001 model has a huge gap. So, during loading, the machine would simply collaps itself. As the tracks push forward the cross tube, this force has to directed directly into the cutting blade. I simply added a bent piece of 1mm brass sheet. Not perfect, but an improvement.

IMG_20200705_213411 by FatCatGotHot


Best regards,
Max
kcmtoys
Posted: Sunday, July 05, 2020 8:03:27 PM

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Joined: 4/3/2003
Posts: 2,081
Location: Rockford,IL.
Very good idea Max.
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 12:55:00 PM
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hey mates,

I hope your 2021 has started in a good way. Outside it's snowing, scrapedozers are in the shop for maintenance - perfect time for scale modeling! So I finally have finished another model, the MENCK M251 Rock Ripper is done. Hallelujah. This was one of these models where more mishaps came down the road as I thought they were possible. I'm really glad how it came out in the end.

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 027

This 3 1/2 cy Menck M251 rock shovel was a dedicated ripping machine. Driven by a 2929 ci DEUTZ shunter engine of 250 HP, it produced 57 tons of bail pull via a torque converter. The 85 ton machine had a specialized ripping fork and was used in the 1950ies during dam construction in the high mountains of Switzerland. It's rear carbody was especially armored to withstand rock slides. The 1955 MACK B-8136 6x6 dump truck is the perfect match for this shovel.

I have this VW bully and it is just a great referrence for the size of the MENCK:

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 025


But for safety reasons, let's better take the MACK! (After all, the VW is from our toll authorities...)

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 023

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 021

Special attention was givin to the weathering of the bucket, as heavy ripping leads to very destinct sratches on the metal.

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 020

After 5-6 passes, the B-8136 can depart!

M251 Heavy Duty ripper dipper 022


Cheers,

Max


modelmaniac
Posted: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 1:46:55 PM

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Joined: 10/4/2005
Posts: 983
Location: england
Love that bucket.Applause You can actually picture a face in it,LOL.Looks like a dinosaur!
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 1:57:52 PM
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hahaha, you are absolutely right! XD And I did see it, too, because as a kid, I loved reading the children books by Richard Scarry and his power shovels had the same face:

modelmaniac
Posted: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 2:07:25 PM

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Joined: 10/4/2005
Posts: 983
Location: england
No wonder Ma Pig,is surprised.I did not know power shovels could fly!Those Richard Scarry books bring back some old memories,I knew I had seen those characters before.Smile
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Thursday, May 06, 2021 2:48:54 PM
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hey mates,

time to keep up the HO scale side of our hobby, isn't it? I just want to point out that following custom has absolutely nothing to do with skyrocketing wood prices. It was rather this picture of a Mercedes roundbonnet 2628 still used in Malaysia that triggered a "Want to have" in 1/87th scale on my side:




So, it's the firast time I'm building a logging truck. I was thinking to use Kibri or Herpa parts for the bunks - but as the originals are 12 feet wide, available parts would be just too small.
I started with a Preiser 6x6 chassis. The Mercedes L2628 is the turbo-version of the 2624 (280HP instead of 240), it was only available as a 6x4. So I built a new front axle and added a Herpa steering kit.
i live not far away from the Mercedes truck factory at Wörth. The L2624 is a legendary truck. Not very powerful, but sturdy. 2628 means 26 metric tonnes GVW and 280 horses.

index 1 by FatCatGotHot

index 2 by FatCatGotHot

index 3 by FatCatGotHot

The logging equipment is scratchbuild from Evergreen sheet and profiles. It resembles losely equipment by German manufacturer Doll. The tank is somewaht larger that the original, but I like its proportions

index 7 by FatCatGotHot

index 4 by FatCatGotHot

index 8 by FatCatGotHot


The axles for the trailer are also from Preiser, but it is mostly from scratch, too.

index 5 by FatCatGotHot

index 6 by FatCatGotHot


Best regards from Germany,

Max

modelmaniac
Posted: Friday, May 07, 2021 9:15:45 AM

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Joined: 10/4/2005
Posts: 983
Location: england
Applause Excellent.Love the details packed into models that small.Have often thought about collecting 1/87 scale.Amazed by r/c 1/87 vehicles.
Mr. Scholz
Posted: Friday, May 07, 2021 3:42:09 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: 7/14/2008
Posts: 247
Location: Germany, CE
Hi Modelmaniac,

yes, 1/87 RCs are mesmerizing. The mechanical shovel kits from kibri/Walthers are really good to use as a base for it. I mostly do 1/87 static models because they do not need much space in the cabinet, but I can show all the details I want to show. And parts supply is really good in HO scale here in Europe. But I also admire the American 1/25th scale model scene, especially the resin custums built by Dave Natale. His part quality is very good and Dave has a good eye to find always very interesting and beautiful looking trucks to replicate. His models sparked my interest in replicating a B-model Mack and the red one shown above is the result of this inspiration. Thanks for your feedback,

Cheers,
Max
catfan1212
Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2024 11:05:08 AM

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Joined: 4/3/2019
Posts: 17
Location: Rhode island
Mr. Scholz wrote:
Hi Brian,

yes, the small parts in 1/87 can be very challenging! On this MENCK, I was working on a tiny wheel - after half an hour of hard work it went "PIEEEW" of the tweezers. Needed a break then. Found it two weeks later dusting my room.

And here is the finished M154, weathered with oil paint, lighter gasoline and chalks. The 60 ton class machine is powred by an 165 HP DEUTZ V8. Swinging the ball it should use about 2,5 gallons of Diesel an hour.



M154011 by FatCatGotHot

M154010 by FatCatGotHot

M154013 by FatCatGotHot

M154014 by FatCatGotHot

Cheers,
Max


Sorry about necroing a potentially long dead thread, but is the twin line setup on the main drums functional and seperate, or are they linked together? I’m curious since I just bought the yellow version of the original kibri kit with a clam and wrecking balls, but it says to use the tagline to operate the clam
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